This Should Cheer Up A Certain Bastard

From The Guardian comes this bit of good news for Radiohead fans …

Radiohead have launched a new online archive of their work, called Radiohead Public Library … releasing previously unavailable rarities to streaming services.

Hosted at radiohead.com, the site features archival material grouped around each of the band’s nine studio albums, including music videos, live TV performances, artwork and the group’s quarterly w.a.s.t.e. newsletter series. It also links to the frequently bizarre, nightmarish and labyrinthine previous iterations of their website.

But wait, there’s more! You can order previously out-of-print T-shirt designs from over the years and even listen to Drill, the band’s 1992 EP.

Get to it, you bastard!

Quantum Supremacy


(artist’s drawing of Google’s quantum computer chip)

In October, Google built a quantum computer that solved an incredibly hard problem in 200 seconds — a problem the world’s fastest supercomputer would take 10,000 years to solve. This is called “quantum supremacy”, and has been compared to the Wright Brothers’ first flight.

”Until recently, every computer on the planet — from a 1960s mainframe to your iPhone, and even inventions as superficially exotic as ‘neuromorphic computers’ and DNA computers — has operated on the same rules. These were rules that Charles Babbage understood in the 1830s and that Alan Turing codified in the 1930s. Through the course of the computer revolution, all that has changed at the lowest level are the numbers: speed, amount of RAM and hard disk, number of parallel processors.

But quantum computing is different. It’s the first computing paradigm since Turing that’s expected to change the fundamental scaling behavior of algorithms, making certain tasks feasible that had previously been exponentially hard. Of these, the most famous examples are simulating quantum physics and chemistry, and breaking much of the encryption that currently secures the internet.

I’m sure this will go well.

More here.