Those Wacky Yugoslavians

Apparently their talent for album art rivaled that of their auto industry. There are far more online than I have time to pass along, but here are a few of the best (?).

Pure Evil

Dimitri Shostakovich wrote this (2nd movement, Symphony #10) as a musical portrait of Stalin, who had harrassed him directly and indirectly throughout his career.  This is pure malevolence, published after Stalin was safely dead.  While Uncle Joe was alive, DS was mostly confined to putting out government approved, “socalist realist” garbage, while keeping much of his “real” work private.  Occasionally he could put one over on the Soviets and follow the letter of their requirements while mocking them.  One cool thing is that in the finale of this same symphony, he has a theme based on his initials, DSCH, vie for dominance against the Stalin theme from this movement.  DSCH wins.  Artistic revenge at its finest.  “He who laughs last, laughs longest.”

The conductor seems a little too into his hair, and I’m not sure why he appears to be grinning during this grim business.    But you’ve gotta give him credit, his musicians are playing the hell out of this.  He made his reputation whipping these young Venezuelans into a respectable unit.  He’s since gone on to greener pastures in LA.

Sweep the leg…

So everyone knows what the biggest sports event of 1984 was right? Damn right you do, it was the epic karate battle between Daniel Laruso and Johnny Lawrence. Well, thankfully the good folks at ESPN have put together a 30 for 30 to commemorate the event. Sort of…

We Want Sweet!

Okay – you have to admit, this YouTube discovery is pretty …

 

 

Wait for it …

 

 

Cool.

What did you think I was gonna say?

A BBC documentary originally broadcast in February 1974 charting 24 hours in the life of a rock band that asks the question: “Is the music business really that glamorous?”
The show contains live material shot on the 21st December 1973 during their legendary concert in the Rainbow Theatre, London.

Featuring the original line-up:

Brian Connolly – lead vocals
Andy Scott – guitar, synthesizer, vocals
Steve Priest – bass, vocals
Mick Tucker – drums, percussion, vocals

Forgotten Music From the Eighties

Tony Carey as Planet P. I haven’t heard this song in probably 30 years. Wiki-wiki-wikipedia says

Following the release of I Won’t Be Home Tonight, Carey was signed to Geffen Records for his third solo album (later to be released as Some Tough City), but he had a great deal of music written that didn’t fit the style of that album. He was able to sign a second record deal with Geffen to record and release that material under the Planet P Project pseudonym, which he would use throughout his career for his more progressive and experimental music. He released his first album under the name Planet P Project in 1983, called Planet P Project (originally titled Planet P), which peaked at #42 on the Billboard 200. On the week ending March 19, 1983, both Planet P Project and Carey’s earlier album I Won’t Be Home Tonight were climbing Billboard’s Rock Albums chart simultaneously, with Planet P Project then at #30 and I Won’t Be Home Tonight reaching its peak at #8. (The following week Planet P Project had made it up to #15, though I Won’t Be Home Tonight had slipped to the #10 position). Planet P Project received modest reviews, despite being listed for two weeks by Billboard as a Top Add. The album, however, contained the more highly acclaimed song “Why Me”, which was released as Planet P Project’s first popular single, reaching #64 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and #4 in the magazine’s Top Rock Tracks chart.

Turns out, this guy was in Rainbow with Ronnie James Dio!

The Jim Jarmusch Zombie Film You’ve Been Waiting For

Yes, please.

THE DEAD DON’T DIE – the greatest zombie cast ever disassembled starring Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton, Chloë Sevigny, Steve Buscemi, Danny Glover, Caleb Landry Jones, Rosie Perez, Iggy Pop, Sara Driver, RZA, Selena Gomez, Carol Kane, Austin Butler, Luka Sabbat and Tom Waits. Written and directed by Jim Jarmusch. In Theaters June 14th.

Looking For Stiv

Goddamn, I’m a sucker for these things.

In his second punk documentary, filmmaker Danny “Looking for Johnny” Garcia takes a deep dive into the life and legacy of the Dead Boys front man. Included in STIV is some rare footage and lore about Stiv’s surprising career before and after the Dead Boys, as well as the hilarious stories and hijinks one associates with the punk legend who died at age 40 in 1990.

Interview with the director right over here.

And here’s a panel interview from the world premiere a few days ago.