Puppet Show And Spinal Tap

Glad to see these guys still get along.

The cast of the cult classic “This Is Spinal Tap” reunited at the Tribeca Film Festival 35 years after the release of their project and chatted with TODAY’s Harry Smith to discuss the origins of the film, its impact on “mockumentary” style cinema and how they built a 17-year history of the characters before filming.

Hell Yes

Judging from this trailer, IT Chapter 2 looks to be another faithful adaptation of the book.

I’m fired up!

Shit

The original Wookiee, Peter Mayhew. Dead at 74.

Watch It While You Can

This one may not be around long, but definitely worth a look.

It occurs to me that one of my earliest childhood memories is going to the Summer Twin Drive-In with my parents. (It’s still around, one of the few drive-ins left in the United States.) Of course, being from the South, we had a pickup truck. My mom and dad watched The Sting. I got in the truck bed, and unbeknownst to them, watched The Exorcist.

I was 4! This explains so much …

Dumbo Redux

I know that we all ride hard for Tim Burton, but I haven’t even seen this yet. Am I kicked off the blaaaaaaaaaaagh?

”Ho-hum until it takes a turn toward the fascinatingly weird, the movie is a welcome declaration of artistic independence for Burton, who often strains against aesthetic and industrial restrictions. Watching him cut loose (more recklessly than his flying baby elephant) is by far the most unexpected pleasure of this movie, which dusts off the 1941 animated charmer with exhilaratingly demented spirit.”

A Monster Science Created – But Could Not Destroy!

The Frankenstein Monster’s skull, possibly one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen. Every detail is perfect, from the flat metal plate on top being held in place by clamps to the wires running down the back of the skull to the neck bolts. My favorite part is the unevenly placed lid, haphazardly attached as if the person who made it didn’t know quite what they were doing – or was in a hurry. The little baroque nameplate on the base is a lovely touch as well.

Discovered amongst several other skeletons in a burned out castle in Darmstadt, Germany this strange skull is all that remains of what is believed to be the creation of Dr. Viktor Frankenstein. While somewhat crude in its design, the function of the skull was to enable repeated surgeries as well as to act as a conductor for electricity. A rudimentary iron skull cap is riveted to heavily calcified bone growth and a bulbous forehead. Wired from the skull down to the base, are the two neck electroconductors.

Sculpted and hand finished by professional artist Thomas Kuebler, this Frankenstein skull with spine is cast in solid resin chosen for its resemblance to actual bone. It measures about 15 inches from the top of the skull to the wood base, and the skull is about 9 inches from the top of the skull to the mandible. No detail has been missed in this mysterious and very rare piece of horror history. It is a must have for Frankenstein fans and horror enthusiasts or the collector of oddities.

This guy sold at auction for $1275.00.