Replacements At A Turning Point

Here’s a great 32-year-old article from SPIN’s archives, from around the time that I was getting into them. (Yes, I was late to the party and had to work my way back through the Twin/Tone albums.) The band had just parted ways with manager Pete Jesperson, fired lead guitarist Bob Stinson, and released one of their best albums, Pleased To Meet Me. Recorded right here in Memphis!

“When we started,” [Westerberg] says, pausing to sip from a midmorning Schmidt, “we definitely had a fear of success. We had a fear of everything. We were all very paranoid, and I think that goes hand in hand with the excessive drinking thing. We’d get drunk because we were basically scared shitless, and that snowballed into image. Now we’re a little more assured of what we’re doing. We’re not positive which way we’re going, but we think we know what mistakes lie ahead, and we’re trying to sidestep ‘em.”

Full article here.

It Doesn’t Get Much Better Than This

Wiki-Wiki-Wikipedia provides a little history and significance.

“Teenage Kicks” was the debut single for Northern Irish punk rock/new wave band The Undertones. Written in the summer of 1977 by the band’s principal songwriter, John O’Neill, the song was recorded on 15 June 1978 and initially released that September upon independent Belfast record label Good Vibrations, before the band—at the time unobligated to any record label—signed to Sire Records on 2 October 1978. Sire Records subsequently obtained all copyrights to the material released upon the Teenage Kicks EP and the song was re-released as a standard vinyl single upon Sire’s own label on 14 October that year, reaching number 31 in the UK Singles Chart two weeks after its release.

Upon first hearing “Teenage Kicks” in September 1978, BBC Radio 1 DJ John Peel is reported to have burst into tears, and readily admitted to still being reduced to tears upon hearing the song in interviews granted to journalists up until his death. To judge songs he had heard for the first time as to worthiness of airplay upon his show, Peel often rated new bands’ songs with a series of asterisks, with each song judged upon a scale of one to five asterisks: Peel was so taken by “Teenage Kicks”, he awarded the song 28 stars. On one occasion, he is known to have played the song twice in a row, with the explanation given to his audience being, “It doesn’t get much better than this.”

In a 2001 interview given to The Guardian, Peel stated that apart from his name, the only words he wished to be engraved upon his gravestone were the opening lyrics to “Teenage Kicks”: “Teenage dreams so hard to beat.”

In February 2008, a headstone engraved with these words was placed on his grave in the Suffolk village of Great Finborough.

Any Good Thing They Ever Sold They Stole

New Titus Andronicus, from the album An Obelisk. Out today!

They’re taking an old religion, fitting it with a different name
Now we’re cutting our own incisions and inserting their hurting pain
It’s another innocent victim shivering in the frigid cold
They’re making a dirty fortune selling something that’s barely working
An inferior version of rock and roll
Or whatever else ever has touched your soul
Call it what you will — there’s a billion of them they sold
They’re taking credit that they’re not earning
Any good thing they ever sold they stole

Oh yeah

They’re making a television different than the old one was
A limited deluxe edition, it’s a superior version of
Of the previous week’s installment, but ain’t it all the same? (Pretty much)
Yet I comfort myself at night with transmission by satellite
It’s like a good enough facsimile of real love
I guess I got a habit same as everyone else does
We’re all banging down doors, trying to grab that stuff
But we never should have left it up to the judge
That passed the bill that illegalized us
They illegalized us

Oh yeah

The inferior version, it isn’t really rock and roll
It’s but a shallow imitation — it doesn’t really get ya goin’
And there ain’t no good explanation why it’s flying off the shelves
It’s a sorry situation — entire world’s going to hell
But I in no way blame myself
Though I helped those bastards to sell that inferior version we love so well
An inferior version of rock and roll
An inferior version of rock and roll
They’re making a dirty fortune off an inferior version of rock and roll

Whoa yeah

Sweet Jebus

8-year-old Japanese girl KILLS IT. Watch her footwork closely – those triplets are a motherfucker.

Favorite YouTube comment: No matter how good you are on your instrument of choice there’s always going to be an Asian child somewhere who’s better than you.

I Will Find A Way

Everybody knows this one. But did you know there was a 1974 Capitol Records version of “Shake Some Action?” (I’m guessing Renfield does.)

A lot of folks on YouTube prefer this other one, but I don’t know. See what you bastards think …

We Want Sweet!

Okay – you have to admit, this YouTube discovery is pretty …

 

 

Wait for it …

 

 

Cool.

What did you think I was gonna say?

A BBC documentary originally broadcast in February 1974 charting 24 hours in the life of a rock band that asks the question: “Is the music business really that glamorous?”
The show contains live material shot on the 21st December 1973 during their legendary concert in the Rainbow Theatre, London.

Featuring the original line-up:

Brian Connolly – lead vocals
Andy Scott – guitar, synthesizer, vocals
Steve Priest – bass, vocals
Mick Tucker – drums, percussion, vocals

Stay Free

Did any of you bastards know that Spotify produces their own podcasts now? Here’s one about The Clash that debuted at the end of February. Obviously, you’ll need a Spotify account to listen, but the free version will get you there.

Check it out here.

I Had A Vision When I Was Young

This is such a great song.

Guitar riffs don’t come any simpler than this one, but the keyboard squiggles, horny lyrics and head-bobbing rhythms on this one are undeniably fun.

John M. Borack, Shake Some Action: The Ultimate Power Pop Guide

Somehow, I’ve never seen Cheap Trick live. SO MANY MISSED OPPORTUNITIES. Next time they’re anywhere close, I’m going. Sucks that I missed the Bun E. Carlos years, though.