I Will Find a Way

Everybody knows this one. But did you know there was a 1974 Capitol Records version of “Shake Some Action?” (I’m guessing Renfield does.)

A lot of folks on YouTube prefer this other one, but I don’t know. See what you bastards think …

Puppet Show and Spinal Tap

Glad to see these guys still get along.

The cast of the cult classic “This Is Spinal Tap” reunited at the Tribeca Film Festival 35 years after the release of their project and chatted with TODAY’s Harry Smith to discuss the origins of the film, its impact on “mockumentary” style cinema and how they built a 17-year history of the characters before filming.

We Want Sweet!

Okay – you have to admit, this YouTube discovery is pretty …

 

 

Wait for it …

 

 

Cool.

What did you think I was gonna say?

A BBC documentary originally broadcast in February 1974 charting 24 hours in the life of a rock band that asks the question: “Is the music business really that glamorous?”
The show contains live material shot on the 21st December 1973 during their legendary concert in the Rainbow Theatre, London.

Featuring the original line-up:

Brian Connolly – lead vocals
Andy Scott – guitar, synthesizer, vocals
Steve Priest – bass, vocals
Mick Tucker – drums, percussion, vocals

Forgotten Music From the Eighties

Tony Carey as Planet P. I haven’t heard this song in probably 30 years. Wiki-wiki-wikipedia says

Following the release of I Won’t Be Home Tonight, Carey was signed to Geffen Records for his third solo album (later to be released as Some Tough City), but he had a great deal of music written that didn’t fit the style of that album. He was able to sign a second record deal with Geffen to record and release that material under the Planet P Project pseudonym, which he would use throughout his career for his more progressive and experimental music. He released his first album under the name Planet P Project in 1983, called Planet P Project (originally titled Planet P), which peaked at #42 on the Billboard 200. On the week ending March 19, 1983, both Planet P Project and Carey’s earlier album I Won’t Be Home Tonight were climbing Billboard’s Rock Albums chart simultaneously, with Planet P Project then at #30 and I Won’t Be Home Tonight reaching its peak at #8. (The following week Planet P Project had made it up to #15, though I Won’t Be Home Tonight had slipped to the #10 position). Planet P Project received modest reviews, despite being listed for two weeks by Billboard as a Top Add. The album, however, contained the more highly acclaimed song “Why Me”, which was released as Planet P Project’s first popular single, reaching #64 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and #4 in the magazine’s Top Rock Tracks chart.

Turns out, this guy was in Rainbow with Ronnie James Dio!

All 139 the Clash Songs, Ranked From Worst to Best

Some (most?) of these picks are absolutely ridiculous. The suggestion that anything off Sandinista! qualifies for the top 25 invalidates the list completely. Still, it’s a good time-waster if you’re stuck somewhere.

If you don’t care to look through the whole thing, here are the top 10.

10. “Rock the Casbah,” Combat Rock (1982)
9. “The Card Cheat,” London Calling (1979)
8. “Stay Free,” Give ‘Em Enough Rope (1978)
7. “Death or Glory,” London Calling (1979)
6. “The Magnificent Seven,” Sandinista! (1980)
5. “Complete Control,” single (1977)
4. “Hitsville UK,” Sandinista! (1980)
3. “London Calling,” London Calling (1979)
2. “Straight to Hell,” Combat Rock (1982)
1. “(White Man) in Hammersmith Palais,” single (1977)

Whole stupid thing here.

Stay Free

Did any of you bastards know that Spotify produces their own podcasts now? Here’s one about The Clash that debuted at the end of February. Obviously, you’ll need a Spotify account to listen, but the free version will get you there.

Check it out here.

I Had a Vision When I Was Young

This is such a great song.

Guitar riffs don’t come any simpler than this one, but the keyboard squiggles, horny lyrics and head-bobbing rhythms on this one are undeniably fun.

John M. Borack, Shake Some Action: The Ultimate Power Pop Guide

Somehow, I’ve never seen Cheap Trick live. SO MANY MISSED OPPORTUNITIES. Next time they’re anywhere close, I’m going. Sucks that I missed the Bun E. Carlos years, though.

Ramones 12th Show Ever

CBGB, September 15th, 1974. If there’s anything better than this, I don’t want to know what it is. Including the between-song arguments and Tommy bitching about how fast everything is.

1) Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue
2) I Don’t Wanna Go Down to the Basement
3) Judy Is a Punk