I’m In

What’s not to love?

High Score is a documentary series about the golden age of video games, when legends – from Pac-Man to Doom – were brought to life. Through ingenuity and sheer force of will, computer pioneers and visionary artists from around the globe spawned the iconic worlds of Space Invaders, Final Fantasy, Street Fighter II, Mortal Kombat, Sonic the Hedgehog, MADDEN NFL, and beyond. Without rules or roadmaps, players and innovators alike pushed the limits of money to be made, rivals to be crushed, and hearts to be won. This is the story of the brains behind the pixels and how their unmatched innovation built a multi-billion dollar industry – almost by accident. High Score premieres on Netflix on August 19, 2020.

Realistic Cartoon Characters

From Design You Trust. Yikes.

Ontario-based artist Miguel Vasquez seeks to distort our feelings about these cartoon characters with some reality twists. He creates realistic renditions of famous cartoon characters that might even disturb you.

Happy Happy Joy Joy

Coming August 14, a documentary about the creation and influence of Ren & Stimpy! SPOILER ALERT: Here’s another one of those instances where you must appreciate the art but hate the artist. From Gizmodo

Directors Ron Cicero and Kimo Easterwood promise an honest and direct look at what Kricfalusi brought to the world of animation as well as what he took away from it, with reports of failing to deliver episodes on time and fostering a hostile work environment. According to the documentary description, it will also address the allegations of sexual misconduct. They were first brought to light in 2018 by Buzzfeed, and included an admission that Kricfalusi had engaged in a relationship with a 16-year-old girl. It’s clear from the trailer that the folks who worked on Ren & Stimpy have great respect for the show and how it’s influenced the world of animation, but that it’s hard to rectify that with the knowledge that the person who created it was responsible for so much pain and suffering.

Close Enough

Regular Show is my go to video comfort food. This new series by creator J.G. Quintel was supposed to hit TNT a couple of years ago, but TNT cancelled its animation block (thanks Louis C.K.) and here we are: soon to appear on HBO Max.

Turbocharged: The Unauthorized Story Of The Cars

On Amazon Prime (for rental, though, $1.99). Completely ridiculous, and I have no idea how accurate it tracks to the band’s actual history. A better writer describes it as

Exaggerated personalities, terrible wigs, and an unorthodox plot make this hilarious film the breath of fresh air the genre needs. Narrated by a snowman a la Rankin/Bass, Turbocharge revolves around The Cars’ reputation for being robotic and boring during live shows, and their supposed determination to correct that perception with the fans. Running alongside that thread is the assertion that bassist Ben Orr was secretly plotting to wrest the control of the group from co-founder and songwriter Ric Ocasek. In an unexpected twist, Phil Collins is delightfully in the middle of it all.

Very low budget, obviously doesn’t have any cars songs in it, and is funnier than it should be.