Music Will Save Us All?

As this site’s extremely senior medical correspondent, I’m happy to report that I received my first COVID 5g chip a couple of weeks ago and am scheduled to inject the second one tonight. My corpuscles and sinews have nearly hit the intended full metal zone vibrato. More on the uh, science, here.

No Such Thing As Too Much

Bitch!

See never-before-seen on-set footage and outtakes from Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, with commentary by members of the cast and crew who brought the first Star Wars sequel to life. Featured are rare behind-the-scenes moments captured by the film’s documentary crew, including the frozen exteriors of Hoth, the Rebel base hangar, interiors of the Millennium Falcon, Cloud City, and the film’s climactic duel between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker. Also included is an all-new and archival audio commentary by George Lucas, Mark Hamill, Anthony Daniels, Billy Dee Williams, and Lawrence Kasdan.

Tell Us About The Pixies

Two great turns of phrase, among many:
– “screaming mass of flesh” describing Black Francis
– “psychotic Beatles” in reference to the band

Enjoy the intro on this cover:

The Skegss = The Shaggs + The Scruffs? Help me out…

Monorail!

Production-wise, the show hadn’t worked out how to achieve these bigger, more spectacular episodes. The writers loved them and the producers loved them. We all loved them. But there were people at the animation studio who were like, “We have to tell them to cut back. These are too complex.” Part of me is thinking, ‘We’re asking for a lot.’ But the artist, or even the kid, in me is thinking, ‘No, these are fucking awesome and we just have to figure out how to do them.’ I always leaned more that way, because I liked the ambitiousness of the episodes and where it took the show. From just a family comedy to these big, overwhelming animated pieces. They were like little movies.

– from An Oral History of ‘Marge Vs. The Monorail’, a great read. Season 4 is now regarded as peak Simpsons, but at the time there were already complaints that the show had lost its way.

My own town has toyed with the idea of a monorail as a solution to the mass transit problems that will only get worse.

The Virgin Hyperloop seems to have everone’s attention now.

But as I learned in a fantastic article here, we are basically re-inventing technology that already exists and not doing it well. Lemme transposplain to ya:

In a vacuum (a figurative one: an alternate universe in which the rest of the post-industrial world were not absolutely goddamn bursting with operating networks of authentic high-speed rail; where high-speed rail were not already such a well-developed form of transit that the TGV system, which routinely moves huge numbers of day-to-day commuters across large distances of France at speeds well more than twice that achieved by this sad two-person billion-dollar pod going from nowhere to nowhere across a tiny patch of worthless desert, were not both infinitely better and more sophisticated than any presently available commercial rail in the United States and fairly outmoded in comparison to newer [yet still not all that new!] systems in China and Japan and elsewhere) the Virgin Hyperloop could almost look like an impressive accomplishment.

What He Said

Finished the second season of The Boys last night. It wasn’t nearly as great as the first, as this guy so helpfully explains. Here’s hoping the next outing recalibrates.

Blame The Robot

I’ll be more impressed when he can slap a mean stand-up bass.

Sakuran Zensen

The band’s name is Sakuran Zensen. Sakuran means ”crazy” (sort of) and Zensen means ”front of the line.” So Sakuran Zensen means ”front of the line of the crazies.” In an interview with a publicity company, the singer told them that they did not pick this name for any other reason than ”it sounded cool.”