Music In The Air

Sister Rosetta rocks a mean axe and sings like she means business.
Enjoy the guitar compilation:

I can’t confirm whether or not she ever opened for Renfield. She played a Les Paul custom with three PAF humbucking pickups, three-way selector switch, two volume and two tone controls; and gold-plated side-action vibrato system.
She helped to pioneer distortion, and her 1964 Manchester show with Muddy Waters was cited as an influence by Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Keith Richards.

No Band, No Problem

When I was at college my band broke up and I started playing solo. I ended up coming by a loop pedal and loved the freedom it gave me. Over the year I’ve added more instruments and effects to my rig as I’ve needed them and my sound output has naturally grown with it. I make a lot of noise for one man.

Funke and the Two Tone Baby. Enjoy some stomp.

Hail Hail Rock ‘N’ Roll!

Stumbled onto this excellent rock ‘n’ roll nugget after reading a review of a new biography coming next week. Recorded between July 2005 and January 2006, released about a year ago. Berry is obviously having a blast.

Live From Blueberry Hill features 10 tracks recorded with Berry’s Blueberry Hill Band. The handpicked group of performers included his daughter and son Ingrid Berry and Charles Berry Jr. on harmonica and guitar, respectively, as well as bassist Jimmy Marsala, drummer Keith Robinson, and pianist Robert Lohr.

The finalized set list varies from covers (T-Bone Walker’s “Mean Old World”) to Berry’s biggest hits, including “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Sweet Little Sixteen,” and “Johnny B. Goode.”

Berry returned to St. Louis for what would become years of performances at Blueberry Hill in an attempt to get back to his roots. Blueberry Hill owner Joe Edwards recalls the exchange: “You know, Joe, I’d like to play a place the size of the ones I played when I first started out.” The selection of the venue was an obvious choice.

This Shit Is Punk Rock

This looks pretty good. Renfield, didn’t you play there?

“Nightclubbing” is the first-ever documentary about the renowned New York City nightclub Max’s Kansas City (1965-1981) which had an indelible impact on the worlds of music, fashion, art, culture and the creation of the city’s punk rock scene.

Featuring rare footage of Iggy & The Stooges, New York Dolls, Sid Vicious and Wayne/Jayne County & classic footage from Johnny Thunders/Heartbreakers, unique archival footage and exclusive interviews with Alice Cooper, Jayne County, Billy Idol, Steve Stevens, music journalist/Patti Smith Band guitarist Lenny Kaye, late New York Dolls guitarist Sylvain Sylvain, Warhol superstars Penny Arcade & Ruby Lynn Reyner, Suicide’s Alan Vega, Bad Brains H.R. & Dr. Know,
Stimulators’ Denise Mercedes, Nick Marden (and their then-12-year-old drummer, future Cro-Mag Harley Flanagan), Twisted Sister’s Jay Jay French, D Generation’s Jesse Malin, Blondie’s Frank Infante, Dead Boys’ Jimmy Zero, Stiv Bators’ girlfriend Cynthia Ross, Mickey Leigh, Shrapnel/Monster Magnet’s Phil Caivano, Punk Magazine founder & Ramones album cover illustrator John Holmstrom, Mink Deville’s Louis X. Erlanger, American Hardcore author Steven Blush and a who’s who of New York’s rock scene of the time, including Elliott Murphy, Bob Gruen, Peter Crowley, Neon Leon, Leee Black Childers, Donna Destri, Sonny Vincent, Phillys Stein and the fabulous Jimi LaLumia.

“Boogie” Said with A Mancunian Accent is My New Drug

I’m addicted to Andrew Hickey’s A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs. I started at #1 after finishing Cocaine & Rhinestones, and have grown progressively more impressed with it. It’s impeccably researched,and so full of good stories and facts you never had any idea of. The episode on “Brand New Cadillac” is masterclass. Highly recommended. I will avoid spoilers.

Episode 77: “Brand New Cadillac” by Vince Taylor and the Playboys

20 Years


Hard to believe, but Up The Bracket turns twenty this year. If a better album’s come out since, I haven’t heard it.