What, Me Worry?

Gone but not forgotten!

This video is only concerned with the artists who contributed to Mad in it’s first two decades – even if some of them carried on for longer. I’ve got nothing against those who came later but I’m selfishly only dealing with the ones who inspired and influenced me as I grew up. They taught me more than 4 years of college ever did. Apparently in the early Kurtzman comic years Mad was printed in colour, although all the examples I found were black and white only, and according to a particularly grumpy viewer Dave Berg didn’t die until 2002. Mea culpa.

This Shit Is Punk Rock

This looks pretty good. Renfield, didn’t you play there?

“Nightclubbing” is the first-ever documentary about the renowned New York City nightclub Max’s Kansas City (1965-1981) which had an indelible impact on the worlds of music, fashion, art, culture and the creation of the city’s punk rock scene.

Featuring rare footage of Iggy & The Stooges, New York Dolls, Sid Vicious and Wayne/Jayne County & classic footage from Johnny Thunders/Heartbreakers, unique archival footage and exclusive interviews with Alice Cooper, Jayne County, Billy Idol, Steve Stevens, music journalist/Patti Smith Band guitarist Lenny Kaye, late New York Dolls guitarist Sylvain Sylvain, Warhol superstars Penny Arcade & Ruby Lynn Reyner, Suicide’s Alan Vega, Bad Brains H.R. & Dr. Know,
Stimulators’ Denise Mercedes, Nick Marden (and their then-12-year-old drummer, future Cro-Mag Harley Flanagan), Twisted Sister’s Jay Jay French, D Generation’s Jesse Malin, Blondie’s Frank Infante, Dead Boys’ Jimmy Zero, Stiv Bators’ girlfriend Cynthia Ross, Mickey Leigh, Shrapnel/Monster Magnet’s Phil Caivano, Punk Magazine founder & Ramones album cover illustrator John Holmstrom, Mink Deville’s Louis X. Erlanger, American Hardcore author Steven Blush and a who’s who of New York’s rock scene of the time, including Elliott Murphy, Bob Gruen, Peter Crowley, Neon Leon, Leee Black Childers, Donna Destri, Sonny Vincent, Phillys Stein and the fabulous Jimi LaLumia.

Shit

Fun facts:

His mother, single and working multiple jobs, invented Liquid Paper in her kitchen blender and made a fortune.

Contra his “quiet Monkee” persona, he had a temper.  When Don Kirshner told them he’d sue the Monkees for breach of contract for wanting more artistic control, Nesmith punched a hole in the wall, telling Kirshner it could have been his face.  He’d grown to think Kirshner was an idiot, especially after DK refused to let the Monkees record his song, “Different Drum,” which afterward became a huge hit for Linda Ronstadt.  (If you ever watched Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert back in the 70’s, he really did sound like an idiot.)

Post Monkees, one of his media companies was defrauded by PBS.  He won in court, and afterward said, “it’s like catching your grandmother stealing your stereo.  You’re glad to get your stereo back, but you’re sad to find out that Grandma’s a thief.”

Happy Birthday To Me?

I’ve never liked this song, but today I HATE it.  At least the Sgt. Pepper album allowed the convenience of skipping this song and George’s Indian drone. You could just flip to Side 2 and start at “Lovely Rita”–not a great one, but I’ve always sorta liked it.

R.I.P. Chawlie

You’ve all heard, but there has to be a shrine here.  There was nothing quite like the Stones firing on all cylinders.  The Faces tried, but couldn’t entirely replicate it.  Some of that mojo came from Charlie.  As much a musician as a drummer, I’d pick him over thousands who might be technically better.