With Someone You Shouldn’t’ve?

June 10th! According to Louder Than War

When we lost one of the UK’s most remarkable singer/songwriters Pete Shelley of Buzzcocks in 2018, we also lost the chance to hear him tell the stories behind some of the songs we love so well, or so it appeared.

However, in 2020, recordings surfaced of a series of long, personal and in-depth interviews between Pete and close friend Louie Shelley. The two had spent hours discussing details of Pete’s life, moving song-by-song through Buzzcocks’ output to reveal his memories of the punk explosion and how he came to write songs such as ‘Ever Fallen in Love (With Someone You Shouldn’t’ve)’ and ‘What Do I Get?’.

Now, to be published in print for the first time and with the blessing of Pete’s estate, these conversations offer us the chance to hear one of the finest songwriters of a generation in his own words at last.

FUN FACT: That cover is based on the 45’s cover art, which is based on Duchamp’s Fluttering Hearts, as described over the phone to the art director!

It’s A Team Effort

Just started reading No Country for Old Men last night, and somehow stumbled onto this video while eating breakfast. It’s a script-to-screen comparison of THAT scene. Brilliantly written, adapted, directed, acted, costumed, lit, shot, edited. It all has to be there for it to work this effectively.

Best YouTube comment regarding Chigurh’s motivation for the coin toss …

I think he would be fine with it either way. The way he sees it, it’s just. The coin makes the decision not him. If the coin says heads then he should be pitied, a worthless peasant able to finish out his life. If its tails, he should be despised for his weakness, a waste, and removed from the earth. Chigurh understands this, that he is both, and the coin simply dictates the action to be taken. So it doesn’t matter either way. There’s always a reason to kill him and there’s always a reason to spare him. So the coin will sort it out.

Willy Wonka Horror

Roald Dahl’s books are pretty twisted for their target audience. Well, here’s what Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory would look like as it should be. The first bit talks about how they made it, but the real fun starts around 12:47. This cracked me up…

The suspense is terrible. I hope it’ll last…

Of course this made me think of this little gem from an earlier version of this blargh

The American Dream Value Menu

After finishing Harrison Scott Key’s first book I went a-Googling, finding his Ted talk from last summer. He’s originally from Memphis!

Harrison Scott Key is the author of two books—Congratulations, Who Are You Again? and The World’s Largest Man, winner of the Thurber Prize for American Humor. He has spoken at TEDx and hundreds of book festivals, conferences, and universities around the nation. Harrison’s humor and nonfiction have appeared in The Best American Travel Writing, Oxford American, Outside, The New York Times, The Bitter Southerner, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Town & Country, The Mockingbird, Salon, Savannah Magazine, Reader’s Digest, Image, Southern Living, Gulf Coast, Creative Nonfiction, and more. He holds an M.F.A. in creative nonfiction and a Ph.D. in playwriting and works at SCAD, where he has held appointments as chair of liberal arts, professor of English, professor of writing, and executive dean. He lives in Savannah, Georgia, with wife and children.

This Is Excellent

If any of you bastards are into Audible books, this one is a must. I bought it a couple of years ago, making my second pass now. Riveting.

David Sedaris tells all in a book that is, literally, a lifetime in the making.

For forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention-overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and through them he has honed his cunning, surprising sentences.

Now, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world. Theft by Finding, the first of two volumes, is the story of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet.

Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can’t fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It’s a potent reminder that when you’re as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there’s no such thing as a boring day.